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Real Life Story: Kian and Callum

Brothers Kian (11) and Callum (7) Jarram from Leicester receive an early Christmas present in the form of new prosthetic feet from the Blatchford clinic in Leicester.

This Christmas, Kian and Callum Jarram received the best Christmas present they could have dreamed of, when they received new silicone prosthetic feet.

Both boys were both born with Adams Oliver Syndrome, a condition that affects the growth of their hands and feet.  The syndrome is an extremely rare condition that also affects the boys’ father, Jon, who has undergone multiple amputations due to the condition and now wears a prosthetic leg and foot. The boys have shortened hands, feet, fingers and toes and Callum has also undergone an amputation to his foot. Jon, Kian and Callum are thought to be the only people in the UK to have Adams Oliver Syndrome.

The boys have never let their condition stand in the way of their love of football, although they both suffered from callousing, sores and bruising of their feet as they did not have suitable prosthetic feet to wear.

Mr Jarram contacted the Blatchford Clinic, enquiring about high definition silicone feet for his sons and within 6 weeks managed to raise enough money to fund new feet for both boys. After an initial consultation with Mark Ledger, Principal Prosthetist at the Blatchford Clinic, casts were made of the boys’ feet. Mark enlisted the help of Sophie de Oliveira Barata, Director of the Alternative Limb Project, to design and manufacture the feet for the boys.

Brothers Kian (11) and Callum (7) Jarram from Leicester receive an early Christmas present in the form of new prosthetic feet from Mark Ledger of the Blatchford clinic in Leicester.

Brothers Kian (11) and Callum (7) Jarram from Leicester receive an early Christmas present in the form of new prosthetic feet from Mark Ledger of the Blatchford clinic in Leicester.

The high definition silicone feet are not only comfortable, allowing Kian and Callum to walk, run and play football without pain or discomfort, but are extremely life-like in appearance. The boys are no longer worried about other children asking them why their feet look different while they get changed at school or walking around the swimming pool. Mr Jarram said “It’s been difficult for the boys, being asked what is wrong with their hands and feet by other children. Life will be easier for them now and I can’t thank Mark enough.”

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